BLOGS: My COW Blog Adobe Blog Editing Technology After Effects Final Cut Entertainment

Richard Harrington's Blog

COW Blogs : Richard Harrington's Blog

Free Apps and Music

image.jpg








If you have an iOS device, it's a great time to pick up the 12 Days of Gifts app from Apple.  You can get It here – https://itunes.apple.com/app/12-days-of-gifts/id777716569?mt=8

Once a day, starting tomorrow, Apple will give folks one free goodie.  Free stuff, what's not to like?




Free Apps and Music Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 25, 2013 at 12:01:44 pm

How to Create a film look with Final Cut Pro X

Episode73_02-500x299.png








Learn how to give your video footage a dramatic “film” look by diving into some color-correction and effect features of Final Cut Pro X in this week’s DSLR Video Tips with Rich Harrington and Robbie Carman.

You’ll learn:

• The tools: Get to know the tools in Final Cut Pro X that can help you achieve a film look with your video footage.
• The post-processing: Learn how to use those tools to create a stylized film look with Final Cut Pro X.

 

Check out both the sample video above and this week’s complete episode on lynda.com.




How to Create a film look with Final Cut Pro X Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 21, 2013 at 8:28:00 pm DSLR VideoApple

More Preparation for Multi-camera Shooting

Episode72_04-500x299.jpg








There’s a lot involved when setting up a shoot with multiple DSLR’s- preparation and planning are key. Finding the location that works for you is important, and lighting it for multiple cameras is a challenge.

On this week’s show, Robbie Carman and Rich Harrington walk you through the key elements for a multiple DSLR camera shoot. They’re joined by Director of Photography Jim Ball for additional tips. You’ll learn the following:

  • Preparing for a Multiple DSLR Camera Shoot. Learn what to think about before you shoot. Multi-camera is all about planning and preproduction.
  • Scout the Location. Walk through a venue and learn to spot potential problems–and opportunities with your shooting location.
  • Lighting for Multiple Cameras. Figure out how to work with available light and position new lights inconspicuously to enhance the scene.
  • A DP’s Perspective on Multi-camera Lighting. Learn how a director of photography approaches a multi-camera production.
  • Matching Cameras. You need to preserve seamless cuts between angles. Learn what needs to be done before you shoot.

Check out both the sample video above and this week’s complete episode on lynda.com. We’ll help you get the best performance, and make editing a breeze.




More Preparation for Multi-camera Shooting Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 14, 2013 at 8:37:00 pm DSLR Video

How to Go from Apple Pages to Dropbox on iOS

image.jpg








A colleague recently asked how could they publish from Apple Pages on an iPad to Dropbox. Turns out the solution is pretty easy and actually opens up additional ways to share files. 







image.jpg








1. Open the desired file and tape the tools button (wrench).







image.jpg








2. Choose Share and Print.

 













 








3. Choose Open in Another App. 







image.jpg








4. Choose a File format. 







image.jpg








5. Choose from a list of compatible apps. 

The same general method also works in Apple Numbers and Keynote.

 




How to Go from Apple Pages to Dropbox on iOS Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 12, 2013 at 12:59:30 pm iPadApple

All My Adorama Videos in One Post

A lot of you may have missed the free training I've produced for Adorama — A great camera store out of New York where I do most of my shopping.  You can see the whole series in this playlist.




To get every video, be sure to subscribe for free.




All My Adorama Videos in One Post Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 9, 2013 at 8:21:26 pm

Prepare for a multi-camera shoot: DSLR Video Tips

multicam.jpg








With the price of cameras dropping lower and lower, using multiple cameras at the same time is a popular production trend. Whether you’re shooting a concert, performance, or how-to video, capturing multiple angles of a shot in perfect sync makes the whole project better. But multi-camera shoots are tricky.

In this week’s DSLR Video Tips, Robbie and Rich show you how to plan for a multi-camera shoot. Director of Photography Jim Ball offers additional insight from his experience with multi-camera shoots.

This week we cover

  • Preparing for a Multiple DSLR Camera Shoot: Learn what to think about before you shoot. Multi-camera is all about planning.
  • Scouting the Location: Walk through a venue and learn to think like a video producer.
  • Lighting for Multiple Cameras: Figure out how to work with available light, and position new lights inconspicuously to enhance the scene.
  • A DP’s Perspective on Multi-Camera Lighting: Learn how a director of photography approaches a multi-camera production.
  • Matching Cameras: You need to preserve a seamless cut between angles; find out how to prepare for this before the shoot.

Check out both the sample video above and this week’s complete episode on lynda.com. We’ll help you capture the best footage and make editing much easier




Prepare for a multi-camera shoot: DSLR Video Tips Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 9, 2013 at 6:10:00 am

Don't Miss the Next Photofocus Hangout About Photoshop




An-Insider's-Look-at-Photoshop-and-the-Future-of-Imaging.jpg










Melissa Niu and Rich Harrington from Photofocus host two of the top experts in digital imaging.  We've got Bryan O'Neil Hughes who's the Senior Product Manager, Adobe Photoshop and Howard Pinsky a Photoshop Guru of Iceflow Studios.

You can sign up for the hangout here — https://plus.google.com/u/0/events/cdj7mrb95bsstklgqqe5ngji9qo?cfem=1&a...






Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 8, 2013 at 5:55:16 am

My Favorite New iPad Air Case and Screen Cover

Like many I bought a new iPad Air.  Thanks to Apple's secrecy, finding a decent case has proven pretty much impossible.  This is because the exact shape and position of buttons was a secret.  Want a case that loosely fits or covers your buttons... no problem.  It's also easy to find one that doesn't shut the device off when you close the lid.

But I like my gear to last and look professional.  After a lot of searching, I'm very happy with the results.

The Perfect Case for iPad Air










31if4SPVJKL._SL400_.jpg



















31KqwYuQvTL._SL400_.jpg



















31RpnMeJoSL._SL400_.jpg



















311abiaWa8L._SL400_.jpg



















414IasVv20L._SL400_.jpg
























I ended up choosing the Bear Motion Case ® For Apple IPad Air. Their website looks terrible and I was a bit skeptical, but here's what I like about it.























  • Proper Fit. The iPad Air fits snuggly and securely inside the case.
  • Light & Sturdy. The case adds no noticeable weight, but doesn't sacrifice sturdiness.  In other words it feels solid but not heavy.
  • The holes line up. From the camera, to the mic, to the speakers.  Nothing is covered or blocked that you need.  All the switches are easy to access and the sound is not impeded.
  • The feel.  This case is leather.  If that bothers you, don't buy it.  I like the feel of leather. This particular one is  Beautiful Brazilian buffalo hide. The case is not slippery, but it is a smooth finish.
  • The magnets work. Closing the lid puts the iPad asleep.  Most of the cases shipping right now don't work as the magnets don't properly line up with the sensor.
  • View at Four Angles. You can angle the screen to four positions when open to make typing and viewing more comfortable.

The Perfect Screen Cover for iPad Air










ivisor-air-black_3.jpg



















ivisorag_ipad_air_b1.jpg



















ivisorag_ipad_air_b2.jpg



















ivisorag_ipad_air_b3.jpg
























I've been very happy with this brand of covers in the past.  In fact I use them across all my devices.  The screen protector is literally washable. I just picked up the Moshi iVisor AG for iPad Air - Black. The screen protector is expensive, but it's the easiest to install and the one I put on my last iPad has lasted for two years and is still going strong. The antiglare is hard to find, so you may have to go for clear.  I expect stock to come in soon.























  • The look.   Antiglare surface improves readability. High transparency ensures minimal impact to brightness. Shows very few fingerprints.
  • The install. 100% bubble free. Installation takes only seconds
  • The durability.  iVisor can be washed and reapplied repeatedly. Hardened surface treatment for enhanced scratch protection.
  • The feel. EZ-Glide surface treatment makes touch screen maneuverability as good as the original surface.



My Favorite New iPad Air Case and Screen Cover Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 7, 2013 at 7:38:00 am iPadApple

Keynote tutorial: Assembling a Layered Graphic File in Keynote

Keynote integrates well with Photoshop, which means you can easily import PNG files for use in your presentations. In this tutorial, find out how to assemble a layered file in Keynote, and get some expert tips for building presentations based on Photoshop images, such as making your PNGs all the same dimension. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/Keynote-tutorial....
 






Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 6, 2013 at 8:18:00 am Apple

Long Exposure Time-lapse Essentials

letlbanner.jpg








In order to capture a moving street shot, I turned to long exposure. To really see the lights and energy of the scene, I wanted to elongate the action.  Here’s the logic I applied to the shot.







letlcompare.jpg








  1. First I set the camera to manual mode to avoid any significant settings changes from shot to shot.  With timelapse, you want to see variation over time, so the last thing you want is an aperture or shutter changing.
  2. Next I stopped the camera all the way down and shot ƒ/22.  This let the least amount of light into the sensor.
  3. I set the shutter speed to create the sense of motion.  In this case I found that 2.5 seconds was enough for the look I wanted.  People and cars standing still (at the intersection) were relatively clear, while those in motion became a long streak.  I also wanted the lights to take on a starburst.
  4. Lastly I refined the ISO to achieve a proper exposure. In this case a value of ISO 800 was needed to get the shot.  This was due to the smaller sensor of the OM-D E-M1 and the fact that I was stopped down so small.






adjustletl.jpg








Once the shot was done, assembly was easy.  We’ve covered these techniques already on Photofocus.  Here’s the highlights of my workflow.







letlcompare.jpg








  1. I used Adobe Camera Raw to develop the files and sync the same settings to all images.  In this case a slight Clarity and Curves adjustment helped.  Noise reduction was also used.
  2. An image sequence was created.
  3. The image sequence was imported into Adobe After Effects.
  4. I interpreted the sequence at 12 fps (half the frame rate I needed).
  5. I stretched the image to 200% and turned on frame blending. This forces a motion blur between shots (essentially a series os short dissolves) to emphasize the streaking.
  6. I used keyframes to create a zoom on the shot.

All in all, post processing was only 10 minutes to create the shot.  I am happy with the end results and continue to explore using smaller apertures and longer exposures when shooting timelapse shots of nighttime activities or subjects that involve water or wind.

 

For more on photography, be sure to check out Photofocus.com




Long Exposure Time-lapse Essentials Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 5, 2013 at 6:00:00 amComments (1) AdobeDSLR VideoVideo

Get Photoshop and Lightroom for $9.99 a Month

psprogramnew.jpg








Adobe recently unveiled its Photoshop Photography Program which let Photoshop CS3 (or newer) customers get Photoshop CC and Lightroom for US $9.99 a month.  Many of you were upset that Creative Suite owners and Lightroom customers couldn’t participate.  We told you to be patient.

The time has arrived (but the window of opportunity is short). Starting today, the Photoshop Photography Program is available to anyone who wants to participate (but only until December 8, 2013). That means you’ve got just under two weeks to decide if you want to participate.

The Photoshop Photography Program includes the following for US $9.99/month with a 12-month commitment:

  • Photoshop CC
  • Lightroom 5
  • 20GB of online storage
  • Behance ProSite
  • Access to training resources on Creative Cloud Learn
  • Ongoing updates and upgrades

I know better than to ask if this makes the naysayers happy…  but I hope that this can solve the decision for those of you left sitting on the fence. To recap. It’s $9.99 a month. You have to subscribe for one year.  They bill you monthly.  The price is expected to stay at this rate for a long time. ANYONE can participate at this rate. You do not need to own any Adobe software to get this deal, it’s the same price for students, teachers, amateurs, or pros.  The website tells you the price for other countries. Visit their website or call their customer support if you have questions.

Get the deal here —  http://adobe.com/go/photographyoffer/

If you’ve been waiting, this is the best deal going…  think of it as Black Friday for photographers.




Get Photoshop and Lightroom for $9.99 a Month Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 4, 2013 at 6:00:00 am

Using Shy Layers in After Effects

Making a layer "shy" hides it from view, allowing you to work with a clean and organized Timeline. In this tutorial, find out how to use shy layers in After Effects and explore some of their advantages. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/After-Effects-tu....

This tutorial is a single movie from the After Effects Guru: Mastering the Timeline course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington. The complete course is 1 hour and 8 minutes and reveals time-saving features for navigating to specific timecodes, adjusting keyframes, changing layer behavior, and other tips for mastering the Timeline panel in After Effects.
 




Using Shy Layers in After Effects Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 3, 2013 at 1:25:59 pm

Using a Click Track to Create a Music Video

ClickTrack.jpg








When you’re working on a music video and need to record a commercial or promo that’s tightly tied to a music track, it’s important to think ahead for post-production. Recording with a click track gives you the ability to sync multiple cameras and multiple takes across several locations. Using consistent, sequential audio cues, known as a click track, will help you sync your visuals in post.

On this week’s show, Robbie and Rich walk you through the benefits of using a click track when recording a musical performance.

This week we cover

• Using a click track: Learn how to use a click track in the field to synchronize multiple cameras.
• Creating a click track: Learn how you can create a click track before you shoot your footage.
• Playing a click track in the field: We’ll go over your options for playback with a click track while on set.
• Recording with a click track in the field: We’ll take you in the field to record a music video.
• Syncing in post–production: Learn how to sync your audio and visuals using a click track.

 

Check out both the sample video above and this week’s complete episode on lynda.com. We’ll help you get the best performance and make editing a breeze.




Using a Click Track to Create a Music Video Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 2, 2013 at 1:44:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo

© 2020 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]