BLOGS: My COW Blog Adobe Blog Editing Technology After Effects Final Cut Entertainment

Richard Harrington's Blog

COW Blogs : Richard Harrington's Blog

Shooting Timelapse? Look for Movement in the Shot

One of my favorite styles of photography is timelapse… showing the passage of time through a series of still photos that are then created into a movie.  This is a great way to see time passing.  For example, here is a simple shot I made during my recent trip to Tokyo.

No matter what you are shooting (people, landscapes, nature) you need to remember a core concept.  Time-lapse is all about the movement of the subject within the frame.  You will want to think about how that movement is going to cover up the photographic frame and pull the eye through.

Being able to identify the movement will help you determine the interval setting to use.  The interval is how often you take a picture.  For example, with the street shot above, I was very close to the action with fast moving subjects.  I shot with a one-second interval and combined that with a two-second exposure.  This led to a lot of streaking shots captured with little gap — hence smooth motion.







© James Bal





© James Bal








On the other hand, if I was shooting a sky and  the clouds barely moving, I’d choose to shoot a longer interval so a sense of drama was created. With experience, you can increasingly make educated decisions about that span between exposures.

Don’t worry, even if you have a little trouble early on, you can just shoot more frames than you need (although this will fill up your camera quicker).  Then in postproduction you can speed up the playback rate.  Just don’t get lazy… you still want to develop your time estimation skills.




Shooting Timelapse? Look for Movement in the Shot Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Feb 27, 2014 at 6:00:00 am

90% of People Have Only Taken a Photo with a Camera Phone in Their Lifetime?

90percentcamera.jpg








As I was browsing my Twitter feed… the following infographic popped up.  Keeping in mind that infographics are created by marketing people most often, you have to take these facts with a grain of salt…







low-light-infographic1.jpg








 

The ad (I mean infographic) is for a new Windows model of a smartphone. Fortunately, they do provide sources for their claims (see the bottom of this page).

“90% of People Have Only Taken Photos on a camera Phone vs. a Camera”

This report released earlier this year points out that there are 5.2 Billion mobile phones on the planet for a population of 4.3 Billion users (yes, some people have multiple phones).  83% of all phones have cameras. The survey cites that 90% of all people who take pictures have only done so on a camera phone.

I find this ludicrous.  Maybe 90% of people taking pictures today are using smartphones… although I doubt exclusively. But ever!?!

How Bad Is it Really?

A little quick research will show that traditional camera sales are plummeting. According to Businessweek last year:

Global camera sales are expected to fall 4.3 percent this year to 115.2 million units, according to market researcher IHS. Industrywide camera shipments fell 25 percent in August from a year earlier, according to the Camera & Imaging Products Association in Tokyo. 

Global smartphone camera sales are projected at 1.5 Billion for 2014 — https://www.strategyanalytics.com/default.aspx?mod=reportabstractviewer&...

So yes, I’d say that smartphones are outselling camera 10 to 1… that doesn’t surprise me.  But I don’t believe that 90% of this planet has never touched a traditional camera in their lifetime.

The Future

With camera phones outselling cameras 10 to 1, how long before we start seeing camera manufacturers becoming  apps?  We’ve already seen companies like Tiffen successfully adapt their traditional filters to digital equivalents.  Can modern camera makers make the leap?

Your comments below please.  Is this the future? Or will craft and quality always exist?






Posted by: Richard Harrington on Feb 26, 2014 at 6:00:00 am BusinessPhotography

Clear In and Out Points in the Project Panel

With some of the older features to Adobe Premiere Pro CC you could only create in and out points to one clip, but with the new features, you can create the in and out points to multiple video clips.  In this course, I’ll show you how to use this function in the project panel.


User Interface Improvements: Clear In and Out Points in the Project Panel


To learn more, I’ve created an exciting course called Premiere Pro: Creative Cloud Updates, for Lynda.com

http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials/Clear-out-points-Project-panel/126763...


Adobe Premiere Pro CC has some very exciting new features and updates.  It’s important to stay on top of these new features so you can maximize your experience and workflow as you’re in post production. This course is dedicated to the video producers and editors who need to leverage the latest Premiere Pro tools and techniques fast.  I will cover all of these new features, which include: a customizable user interface, quality and format improvements like the enhanced Mercury Playback Engine, timeline tricks, and media management techniques, and the best audio, multicamera, and closed captioning workflows.

Topics in this course include:

  • Switching between audio waveforms and video
  • Creating a new sequence
  • Integrating scripting with the Story panel
  • Working with different camera formats
  • Selecting and nudging clips
  • Using dupe-detection markers
  • Copying and pasting ranges
  • Nesting sequences
  • Relinking offline sequences
  • Color grading with the Lumetri Deep Color Engine
  • Adjusting clip volume
  • Automatic syncing with audio waveforms
  • Recording multicamera edits
  • Adjusting timing and display of captions
  • Exporting multiple clips/sequences

You can check out the class here - http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials/Clear-out-points-Project-panel/126763...




Clear In and Out Points in the Project Panel Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Feb 25, 2014 at 6:00:00 am

How to Develop Compelling Images in Lightroom

AdoramaHangoutInvEvent.jpg








Join Adorama Learning Center favorites Gavin Hoey, Mark Wallace and Rich Harrington for an in-depth hangout as they share how to get the best from every image using Lightroom. You can sign up for free here — https://plus.google.com/events/cs2fptd8h40q2vvl1pe875p8sfk

Featuring:
Gavin Hoey, host of Take and Make Great Photography




Mark Wallace, host of Exploring Photography




Rich Harrington, host of DSLR Video Skills




 




How to Develop Compelling Images in Lightroom Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Feb 24, 2014 at 6:00:00 am

Nikon D5300 DX-Format DSLR Camera

AdoramaTV presents the Nikon D5300 DX-Format DSLR Camera. Join Rich Harrington as he shows all the of the great features of and sample images from the first APS sensor Nikon DSLR to offer full WiFi communication ability.

Nikon D5300 24.1 Megapixel DX-Format DSLR Camera with Nikon AFS DX 18-140mm Lens - Black - Bundle With Slinger Holster Case Black ,32 Ultra SDHC CL10 Card, New Leaf 3 Year (Spills & Drops) Warranty, Spare ENEL14 Battery, Sunpack Pistol Grip Tripod, Cleaning Kit , Screen Protector, Rapid Charger
http://www.adorama.com/INKD5300BKC.ht...

 




Nikon D5300 DX-Format DSLR Camera Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Feb 23, 2014 at 6:00:00 am

The Ultimate Camera Support Rail

camrha_title1.jpg








I know what some of you are thinking… what the heck is that!?!

It’s a camera support rail… that I’ve heavily modified for a special reason. I’ve been looking for a way to shoot with multiple cameras on a single tripod. This combination lets me attach up to 5 cameras to a single tripod. This is really useful for video shooting as well as time-lapse (as I can get multiple angles/compositions of coverage at once).







multiangle.jpg








The rail system attaches to my tripod (it matches an Arca-Swiss style plate). On the rail are two small clamps (with room for a third) to hold each camera body. At each end is a GoPro mount.  This can hold 4-5 cameras at once. Cameras can be angled in each direction for 360˚ of coverage of an environment.







camrha.jpg








 

This is a cleaner shot of it (although it was shot in my hotel room in Tokyo, so no perfect studio lights here).

The Pieces

Here are the pieces I used to build this (and for those of you familiar with Really Right Stuff the quality is high and so are the prices).


  • BHERO3-B: GoPro Buckle Adapter Plate          2  @ $39.00  =   $78.00
  • Mini-Clamp Package                                            1  @  $110.00  = $110.00
  • CB-EC: Camera Bar End Connector                    2 @  $30.00  = $60.00
  • B2-mAS: 38mm clamp with dual mounting       2   @   $60.00 = $120.00
  • CB-18 Package: CB-18 and Mini Clamps           1   @   $245.00 = $245.00
    • CB-18: 18-inch Camera support bar   
    • B2-mAS: 38mm clamp with dual mounting   
    • B2-FAB 38mm clamp with threaded socket  

TOTAL $613.00







closeupscamrha.jpg








Features

  • The clamps are a safe way to attach any camera with an Arca-Swiss style plate.

  • The rail has a built-in bubble level to get a straight shot.
  • The clamps can be repositioned side to side.
  • The center cameras can be mounted either direction.
  • The GoPro buckles work with standard GoPro mounts so you can connect the cameras.
  • I used the bendable knuckles included with each GoPro to create a camera that can be angled to shoot in any direction for greater flexibility.
  • The whole unit weighs about 5 pounds without cameras attached.
  • The open spaces in the bar make it lighter and allowed me to attach aVulture Equipment Works strap for easy carrying.






articulate.jpg









I am quite pleased with how it’s turned out.  I was able to easily gather a lot more options when shooting video and time-lapse (safe to say I tripled my output os usable shots).

Geeky… yes.  Pricey… uh huh.  Virtually indestructible… absolutely.




The Ultimate Camera Support Rail Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Feb 22, 2014 at 6:04:34 am DSLR VideoVideoPhotography

How to Slide a Camera: DSLR Video Tips

sliderbanner.jpg








On this week's DSLR video tips we explore how to add an extra element of professionalism and dynamism to your shots by using a slider.  You can watch for each week's episode for free the week it is released.

Robbie Carmen and  I  explore the various methods, techniques, and types of sliders out there. Joining us is director of photography Kevin Bradley, sharing his expertise and personal tips for creating smooth tracking camera shots.

Paying attention to what’s motivating your shot will help you decide which type of slider and camera speed to use; Kevin and I will take you onto the set of a music video to demonstrate various techniques of tracking and camera speed that will help you slide the camera to achieve the mood you’re after.

You’ll learn

• What tabletop slides are
• Methods and techniques for sliding the camera
• The impact that movement has on your shot
• Adding versatility with sliders

Watch this week’s free videos above and the rest of this week’s tutorial on lynda.com to get started sliding your camera, and be sure to check back next week for more DSLR Video Tips.




How to Slide a Camera: DSLR Video Tips Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Feb 22, 2014 at 6:00:00 am

Nikon D610 DSLR Camera



Adorama TV presents the Nikon D610 DSLR Camera. Join Rich Harrington as he shows all the of the great features of and sample images from the least expensive full-frame 35mm sensor DSLR that Nikon makes.

Related Products:

Nikon D610 FX-format Digital SLR Camera Body, 24.3MP, EXPEED 3, Picture Control, 6 fps Continuous Shooting - USA Warranty
http://www.adorama.com/INKD610.html?r...

Nikon D610 DSLR Camera with 24-85mm VR Lens & 70-300mm VR Lens - Video Bundle - with 32GB SDHC Card, Camera Case, Spare Lithium Battery with Charger, Rode VideoMic, 9V Battery (8pk), Flashpoint Shoulder Rig, Zoom Lever Gear Ring, VL-35 35 LED Light, and LCD Foldaway Viewfinder
http://www.adorama.com/INKD610K3C.htm...

Nikon D610 DSLR Camera with 28-300mm VR Lens - BUNDLE - with Camera Case, Spare Battery, Adorama Battery Grip, USB2 Multi Card Reader, WU-1b Wireless Adapter, 77mm Filter Kit, Wired Remote, 3.2" Screen Protector, On-Camera Mic, Lens Cleaning Kit, Tripod, and New Leaf 3 Year Extended Warranty
http://www.adorama.com/INKD610K2B.htm...




Nikon D610 DSLR Camera Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Feb 19, 2014 at 6:00:00 am

Direct Link to Adobe SpeedGrade

The Adobe workflow is known for its exceptional integration between apps. Premiere Pro and SpeedGrade have a great relationship. SpeedGrade CC is a powerful color grading system with a streamlined interface and in this course I will show you how to work with the SpeedGrade workflow directly from Premiere Pro.


Extending the Power of Premiere Pro: Direct Link to Adobe SpeedGrade

To learn more, I’ve created an exciting course called Premiere Pro: Creative Cloud Updates, for Lynda.com

http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials/Direct-Link-Adobe-SpeedGrade/126763/1...

Adobe Premiere Pro CC has some very exciting new features and updates.  It’s important to stay on top of these new features so you can maximize your experience and workflow as you’re in post production. This course is dedicated to the video producers and editors who need to leverage the latest Premiere Pro tools and techniques fast.  I will cover all of these new features, which include: a customizable user interface, quality and format improvements like the enhanced Mercury Playback Engine, timeline tricks, and media management techniques, and the best audio, multicamera, and closed captioning workflows.

Topics in this course include:

  • Switching between audio waveforms and video
  • Creating a new sequence
  • Integrating scripting with the Story panel
  • Working with different camera formats
  • Selecting and nudging clips
  • Using dupe-detection markers
  • Copying and pasting ranges
  • Nesting sequences
  • Relinking offline sequences
  • Color grading with the Lumetri Deep Color Engine
  • Adjusting clip volume
  • Automatic syncing with audio waveforms
  • Recording multicamera edits
  • Adjusting timing and display of captions
  • Exporting multiple clips/sequences

You can check out the class here - http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials/Direct-Link-Adobe-SpeedGrade/126763/1...





Direct Link to Adobe SpeedGrade Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Feb 17, 2014 at 6:15:00 am AdobeVideo

I’ve Never Watched a Video That Couldn’t Benefit From Being Shorter

shortervideo.jpg








The primary place video is watched these days is on mobile devices. This means small screens and lots of distractions.  Add in changes in the human attention span, and I can’t emphaize enough to keep the total run time low to avoid viewer fatigue.

Here’s a simple idea: Keep your videos short. It is better to have five 3-minute videos than one 15-minute episode. I try to keep most client videos to less than 10 minutes (in fact less than 5 in almost all cases).

With the rise of the web, videos tend to be consumed during things like work breaks, downtime, and airplane flights. Others will use them during commutes on the morning train or the subway. Think of video as portable, on-demand learning or entertainment.

Here are some strategies to keeping the runtime down:

  • Limit the number of topics covered. How may points do you need to make?  I try to stick to one (with a hard limit of three).
  • Can the video be split? If a topic runs too long, look to see if you can create shorter segments that stand alone.  This way the viewer can download Part 1 and start watching it while they’re waiting for the rest to download or be released. There’s nothing wrong with multiple parts.
  • Get a fresh opinion.  Show the video to other people and note when they first look away from their screen or at their watch. That’s when they started to get bored.

Shorter is better…. 






Posted by: Richard Harrington on Feb 15, 2014 at 6:19:00 am BusinessWeb VideoVideo

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
© 2020 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]