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Using Shy Layers in After Effects

Making a layer "shy" hides it from view, allowing you to work with a clean and organized Timeline. In this tutorial, find out how to use shy layers in After Effects and explore some of their advantages. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/After-Effects-tu....

This tutorial is a single movie from the After Effects Guru: Mastering the Timeline course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington. The complete course is 1 hour and 8 minutes and reveals time-saving features for navigating to specific timecodes, adjusting keyframes, changing layer behavior, and other tips for mastering the Timeline panel in After Effects.
 




Using Shy Layers in After Effects Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 3, 2013 at 1:25:59 pm

Using a Click Track to Create a Music Video

ClickTrack.jpg








When you’re working on a music video and need to record a commercial or promo that’s tightly tied to a music track, it’s important to think ahead for post-production. Recording with a click track gives you the ability to sync multiple cameras and multiple takes across several locations. Using consistent, sequential audio cues, known as a click track, will help you sync your visuals in post.

On this week’s show, Robbie and Rich walk you through the benefits of using a click track when recording a musical performance.

This week we cover

• Using a click track: Learn how to use a click track in the field to synchronize multiple cameras.
• Creating a click track: Learn how you can create a click track before you shoot your footage.
• Playing a click track in the field: We’ll go over your options for playback with a click track while on set.
• Recording with a click track in the field: We’ll take you in the field to record a music video.
• Syncing in post–production: Learn how to sync your audio and visuals using a click track.

 

Check out both the sample video above and this week’s complete episode on lynda.com. We’ll help you get the best performance and make editing a breeze.




Using a Click Track to Create a Music Video Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Dec 2, 2013 at 1:44:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo

Use Brainstorm in After Effects

With the Brainstorm tool, you can create new, randomly generated effects for use in your After Effects projects. Find out how to use this tool and experiment with your own effects in this tutorial. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/After-Effects-tutorials/After-Effects-Guru-Mastering-Timeline/144848-2.html?utm_campaign=hHYAqr6sOhs&utm_medium=viral&utm_source=youtube. This tutorial is a single movie from the After Effects Guru: Mastering the Timeline course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington.




Use Brainstorm in After Effects Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 30, 2013 at 1:23:00 pm AdobeMotion Graphics

Fixing the Exposure Triangle Beyond Camera Settings

Throughout the past month, we’ve tackled the exposure triangle—the critical way to get properly exposed photos and videos. Remember your camera and lens have three essential controls that affect how much light comes into the camera: the aperture or opening of the lens, the shutter speed (how long the shutter opens), and the ISO (the sensitivity of your sensor).

But a problem as tough as exposure can still be hard to crack. What happens when you can’t get more light into the camera and the shot is dark? How about when you want shallow depth of field and the shot is overexposed? Sometimes you have to look past the camera and make external changes to get the results you want.

This week we cover

• Controlling exposure beyond camera settings:
How do you know when it’s time to stop pushing buttons on the camera and make a physical change to your shoot?

• Adding light:
Is your shot underexposed? When is it time to add more light—or reposition your subject?

• Adding filtration:
Too much light can also be a problem. Did you know that you can give your camera a “pair of sunglasses” when shooting in bright light?




Fixing the Exposure Triangle Beyond Camera Settings Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 29, 2013 at 2:48:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo

Keynote Tutorial: Animating images

It can be hard to keep your audience engaged during a presentation, but don't worry; Keynote offers you a way to spice things up: animating your images. Find out how to animate images in Keynote in this tutorial. Watch more athttp://www.lynda.com/Keynote-tutorial....

This tutorial is a single movie from the Keynote: From Outline to Presentation course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington. The complete course is 2 hours and 10 minutes and shows how to build and deliver a great Keynote presentation.
 




Keynote Tutorial: Animating images Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 22, 2013 at 1:41:00 pm AppleBusiness

DSLR tutorial: The Exposure Triangle

When shooting video, exposure requires an almost scientific understanding of light. In this tutorial, explore a straightforward way to get strong, well-exposed shots with your DSLR. Watch more athttp://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials...




DSLR tutorial: The Exposure Triangle Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 20, 2013 at 1:33:00 pm DSLR Video

Keynote Tutorial: Adding a Photo to a Drop Zone

Keynote's themes often include drop zones--areas where you can drop several photos of different sizes and have them formatted consistently, which will save you time when building your presentations. Find out how to add a photo to a drop zone in this tutorial. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/Keynote-tutorial....

This tutorial is a single movie from the Keynote: From Outline to Presentation course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington. The complete course is 2 hours and 10 minutes and shows how to build and deliver a great Keynote presentation.
 




Keynote Tutorial: Adding a Photo to a Drop Zone Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 18, 2013 at 1:40:00 pm AppleBusiness

Understanding GoPro Bodies

GoPro cameras are great for time-lapse, underwater, and aerial photography. This tutorial takes a detailed look at GoPro cameras. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials....




Understanding GoPro Bodies Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 12, 2013 at 1:35:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo

Elevate Your Video Camera

A great way to create more interesting video perspectives is to raise your camera higher. Positioning the camera above any scene gives a unique view—and putting the camera into motion from that position can result in really dynamic shots.

In this week’s video, we look at a couple of tools for raising your camera up higher, and discuss techniques for getting the most out of elevated shots.

This week we cover

  • Using a monopod to extend your reach. Learn why a monopod is one of the easiest ways to get the camera up higher and extend it into a scene.
  • What is a jib? A jib is an extremely popular way of elevating the camera, while also putting it into motion. We’ll check out all the various features and parts of a jib system.
  • Operating a jib. Catch up with director of photography Jim Ball and learn about some hard-won techniques for operating a jib.
  • Real-world examples.  We’ll evaluate several elevated shots from a recent music video shoot, breaking down what worked and what didn’t.



Elevate Your Video Camera Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 11, 2013 at 3:04:00 pm DSLR VideoVideo

Keynote tutorial: Ken Burns effects with Magic Move

The Ken Burns effect involves panning and zooming on a still image. In this tutorial, Rich Harrington sheds some light on how you can use the Magic Move feature to create Ken Burns effects in your Keynote presentations and make them stand out. Watch more athttp://www.lynda.com/Keynote-tutorial....

This tutorial is a single movie from the Keynote: Using Photos and Videos Effectively for Great Presentations course presented by lynda.com author Rich Harrington. The complete course is 2 hours and 39 minutes and shows how to add photos and video to your Keynote presentation and make it more professional and engaging.
 




Keynote tutorial: Ken Burns effects with Magic Move Republished by Richard Harrington


Posted by: Richard Harrington on Nov 9, 2013 at 1:42:00 pm AppleBusiness

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